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A Naturopathic Approach for Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder (ADD/ADHD) December 10, 2015

Posted by Dreamhealer in ADHD, Cancer, cancer therapy, integrative cancer care, Naturopathic Doctor, Naturopathic Medicine.
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adhd-vancouver-doctor
Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder (ADD/ADHD) is a term that covers a wide variety of symptoms. The most common ones include decreased concentration, poor organizational skills, decreased attention, impulsivity, learning difficulties and restlessness, to name a few.

Many children diagnosed with ADD/ADHD are treated with various medications. Side effects of these types of drugs may include abdominal cramps, insomnia, depression, headache, dizziness, high blood pressure and appetite suppression. Additionally, medication such as Ritalin which is a common stimulant used to treat ADD/ADHD can make patients prone to dependence on the medication.

Naturopathic medicine approaches the treatment of behavioural challenges in children for a holistic point of view. The naturopathic approach to ADD/ADHD may involve establishing optimal nutrition, supplementing where necessary and identifying any food sensitivities/allergies or irritants that could be instigating the symptoms.

While the goal of treatment is not to change who they are as people, there are treatment options to help ease symptoms such as learning difficulties, impulsivity, digestion issues, inattention, difficulty focusing, anxiety, as well as eating habits, coordination, mood and sleep, and finally to help them function optimally.

Contact us today to book an appointment and begin your healing journey with the Yaletown Naturopathic Clinic

Diabetes Drugs for Cancer? September 24, 2015

Posted by Dreamhealer in Cancer, cancer therapy, Diabetes, Naturopathic Doctor, naturpathic medicine.
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Diabetes drugs
Written by: Dr. Adam McLeod, ND, BSc (Hons)

Can drugs traditionally used for diabetes also be helpful with cancer? There is a growing body of evidence which indicates that both Metformin and a class of drugs known as thiazolidinediones can be a useful adjunctive cancer therapy. The biochemical mechanism behind this anticancer effect is poorly defined but there are some intriguing theories about the mechanism of action.

Metformin is the first line drug for patients with Type 2 diabetes and it is certainly effective at getting the blood sugar under control. Diabetic patients who regularly take metformin have a lower risk of developing cancer1. Metformin activates an enzyme known as AMPK. A recent breakthrough has found a key regulator of AMPK to be a protein known as LKB1. LKB1 is a well recognized tumour suppressor. Activation of AMPK by metformin and exercise requires LKB1, and this would also explain why exercise is beneficial in the primary and secondary prevention of certain cancers2.

Recent studies strongly indicate that the anticancer effects of metformin are indeed linked to AMPK3. Metformin appears to selectively target cancer stem cells, and acts together with chemotherapy to block tumour growth and prolong remission4. When used with doxorubicin it acts synergistically to reduce tumour mass and relapse rates more effectively than either drug alone.

There is a completely different class of medications that is also used for diabetes which appears to have anticancer effects. The drug class is known as thiazolidinediones. One of the most well known drugs in this class is called Avandia. Even though both of these drugs are effective at treating diabetes they work by a completely different mechanisms. The thiazolidinediones activate a receptor called PPAR and by activating this receptor it triggers a cascade of reactions that are beneficial to patients fighting cancer6,7,8. The drug increases the activity of a key tumour suppressor called PTEN5. This tumour suppressor is a protein that halts the growth of cancer cells by inhibiting an enzyme known as PI3K. There are many types of cancer that are dependent on inhibiting the function of the tumour suppressor PTEN. The bottom line is that this drug helps to put the brakes on the growth of cancerous cells by activating PTEN.

As more research accumulates supporting the fact that these antidiabetic drugs can be used to treat cancer, one thing is becoming clear. The anticancer effect from these drugs is due to their influence on several different metabolic pathways. The great thing about these medications is that they have a long history of use and they are well established as safe adjunctive cancer therapies. Like any medication it has to be used in the right context and this therapy is not for everyone. A Naturopathic doctor who focuses in oncology will go through your entire case history to determine if this treatment is indicated. Contact your local naturopathic doctor to see if this therapy is right for you.

Dr. Adam McLeod is a Naturopathic Doctor (ND), BSc. (Hon) Molecular biology, First Nations Healer, Motivational Speaker and International Best Selling Author.
He currently practices at his clinic, Yaletown Naturopathic Clinic, in Vancouver, BC where he focuses on integrative oncology.

References:
1) Evans, Josie MM, et al. “Metformin and reduced risk of cancer in diabetic patients.” Bmj 330.7503 (2005): 1304-1305.

2) Bauman AE.Updating the evidence that physical exercise is good for health: an epidemiologic review.J Sci Med Sport2004; 7:6–19.

3) Zakikhani, Mahvash, et al. “Metformin is an AMP kinase–dependent growth inhibitor for breast cancer cells.” Cancer research 66.21 (2006): 10269-10273.

4) Hirsch, Heather A., et al. “Metformin selectively targets cancer stem cells, and acts together with chemotherapy to block tumor growth and prolong remission.” Cancer research 69.19 (2009): 7507-7511.

5) Farrow, Buckminster, and B. Mark Evers. “Activation of PPARγ increases PTEN expression in pancreatic cancer cells.” Biochemical and biophysical research communications 301.1 (2003): 50-53.

6) Bunt, Stephanie K., et al. “Rosiglitazone and Gemcitabine in combination reduces immune suppression and modulates T cell populations in pancreatic cancer.” Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy 62.2 (2013): 225-236.

7) Monami, Matteo, Ilaria Dicembrini, and Edoardo Mannucci. “Thiazolidinediones and cancer: results of a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.” Acta diabetologica 51.1 (2014): 91-101.

8) Srivastava, Nishi, et al. “Inhibition of Cancer Cell Proliferation by PPARγ Is Mediated by a Metabolic Switch that Increases Reactive Oxygen Species Levels.” Cell metabolism (2014).

Mistletoe the Parasite July 13, 2015

Posted by Dreamhealer in cancer therapy, Naturopathic Medicine.
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Mistletoe

Written by: Dr. Adam McLeod, ND, BSc(Hon)

Mistletoe is a parasitic plant that directly derives almost all of its nutrition from other flowering plants. By parasitizing other plants, they have a competitive advantage over many other forms of life because they do not have to compete in soil for their water and nutrient needs. This description of mistletoe sounds surprisingly similar to how cancer operates. When you look at mistletoe growing on a tree it looks very much like a tumour. Cancer gets all of its nutrition from other cells within the human body and it has a competitive advantage because it does not abide by the same rules as other cells in the body.

It turns out the mistletoe can be used to effectively treat cancer, even in advanced cases1,2,3. In North America this is often considered a “fringe treatment” yet if you go to Germany this is a mainstream therapy that is well established by the scientific community. The use of mistletoe dramatically reduces the side effects associated with chemotherapy and radiation. The effects are so dramatic that some countries have already made this the standard of care for cancer treatment. The use of mistletoe as the new standard of care was of huge financial benefit to these countries because of the significant decrease in complications from chemotherapy and radiation.

Although there are several different ways to administer mistletoe, the most common is regular subcutaneous injections. This involves the use of small insulin needles and injecting the mistletoe just under the skin. After injecting the mistletoe lectins the immune system immediately begins to attack the injected fluid resulting in a small red rash around the injection site. This immune activation is an excellent outcome in the context of cancer. By activating the immune system at the site of injection it consequently activates the immune system in the entire body.

Mistletoe has been shown to stimulate increases in the number and the activity of several types of white blood cells4. Immune-system-enhancing cytokines, such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor -alpha, are released by white blood cells after exposure to mistletoe extracts5,6. Other evidence suggests that mistletoe exerts its cytotoxic effects by interfering with protein synthesis in target cells and by inducing apoptosis7.

Just like any cancer therapy it is essential that it is used in the right context. When this therapy is used there will initially be a swelling of the tumour, this is a consequence of the immune activation. If there are any detectable masses contained within the skull, then clearly swelling is not desirable. Mistletoe therapy is contraindicated in patients that have any detectable mass in the brain. It also must be used with caution on patients that are are cachexic and malnourished. The sudden release of cytokines associated with immune activation can worsen the malnourished state.

Mistletoe therapy only costs approximately $250 dollars per month and it can be used in conjunction with other medical therapies. I regularly use mistletoe with my patients at the clinic and it is an effective cancer therapy when used appropriately. On a regular basis I see patients improve when they use this therapy as part of a comprehensive integrative cancer therapy. Contact Yaletown Naturopathic Clinic to see if this is the right therapy for you.

Dr. Adam McLeod is a Naturopathic Doctor (ND), BSc. (Hon) Molecular biology, First Nations Healer, Motivational Speaker and International Best Selling Author. He currently practices at his clinic in Vancouver, British Columbia where he focuses on integrative oncology. http://www.yaletownnaturopathic.com

References:
1. Mistletoe. In: Murray MT: The Healing Power of Herbs. Roseville, Calif: Prima Publishing, 1995, pp 253-9.

2. Samtleben R, Hajto T, Hostanska K, et al.: Mistletoe lectins as immunostimulants (chemistry, pharmacology and clinic). In: Wagner H, ed.: Immunomodulatory Agents from Plants. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhauser Verlag, 1999, pp 223-41.

3. Hajto T, Lanzrein C: Natural killer and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activities and large granular lymphocyte frequencies in Viscum album-treated breast cancer patients. Oncology 43 (2): 93-7, 1986.

4. Büssing A, Regnery A, Schweizer K: Effects of Viscum album L. on cyclophosphamide-treated peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro: sister chromatid exchanges and activation/proliferation marker expression. Cancer Lett 94 (2): 199-205, 1995.

5. Hajto T: Immunomodulatory effects of iscador: a Viscum album preparation. Oncology 43 (Suppl 1): 51-65, 1986.

6. Hajto T, Hostanska K, Frei K, et al.: Increased secretion of tumor necrosis factors alpha, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6 by human mononuclear cells exposed to beta-galactoside-specific lectin from clinically applied mistletoe extract. Cancer Res 50 (11): 3322-6, 1990.

7. Mengs U, Schwarz T, Bulitta M, et al.: Antitumoral effects of an intravesically applied aqueous mistletoe extract on urinary bladder carcinoma MB49 in mice. Anticancer Res 20 (5B ): 3565-8, 2000 Sep- Oct.

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