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Legumes May Aid Glycemic Control, Cut Lipids October 23, 2012

Posted by Dreamhealer in Alternative medicine, Alternatives, Diabetes, Diet, Dreamhealer, Energy Healing, exercise, Healing, Health, Healthcare, Integrative Medicine, Longevity, naturopathic, Research, Skeptics, vitamins.
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By Kristina Fiore, Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Published: October 22, 2012

Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner

Eating more legumes such as beans and chickpeas helped improve  glycemic control and lowered total cholesterol and triglycerieds in patients with type 2 diabetes, researchers found.

In a randomized controlled trial, patients who ate at least an additional cup of legumes per day had a greater reduction in HbA1c than patients who increased their insoluble fiber consumption for 3 months (-0.5% versus -0.3%, P<0.001), David Jenkins, MD, PhD, of the University of Toronto, and colleagues reported online in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Foods with a low glycemic index (GI) have been shown to improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes, and legumes — such as beans, chickpeas, and lentils — were among the first foods recognized to have low GI values.

They’ve been recommended in many nutrition therapy guidelines for diabetes, but their effects on glycemic control and other parameters still remain controversial, researchers say.

So Jenkins and colleagues randomized 121 patients with type 2 diabetes to one of two diets for 3 months: a low-GI legume diet that required them to eat at least a cup of legumes per day, or to a diet that increased their intake of insoluble fiber via consumption of whole wheat products.

The primary outcome was change in HbA1c, with a secondary endpoint of calculated coronary heart disease risk.

The difference they found in HbA1c reduction remained significant after adjustment for body weight change, they reported (P=0.005).

In terms of cardiac parameters, they found that the legume diet significantly lowered mean total cholesterol (-8 mg/dL, P<0.001) and triglycerides (-22 mg/dL, P<0.001), without any changes in HDL cholesterol levels.

The insoluble fiber diet increased average HDL cholesterol levels (2 mg/dL, P=0.004), although the reasons for this are unclear, given that such an association hasn’t been seen before in the literature, the researchers noted.

And the legume diet reduced blood pressure and heart rate relative to the high insoluble fiber diet, they added.

Thus, the legume diet overall reduced heart risk significantly more than the insoluble fiber diet (-0.8%, P=0.003), and the researchers concluded that incorporating legumes into a low-GI diet can help improve glycemic control and reduce heart risk.

In an accompanying editorial, Marion Franz, MS, RD, questioned whether the modest benefits come from the dietary components or from a reduced energy intake overall.

She warned that low-GI diet has been controversial, with some smaller studies showing a benefit in terms of improved glycemic control but larger studies showing no such benefit.

Franz conceded that legumes are part of a healthy diet for diabetics and the general population, but “whether people with diabetes can eat the amount necessary to improve glycemic control is debatable, and, if legumes do improve glycemia, is it because of their low GI or high soluble fiber content?”

She concluded that nutrition therapy for diabetes is effective but “just as there is no one medication or insulin regimen appropriate for all persons with diabetes, there is no one nutrition therapy intervention.”

Action Points

  • Eating more legumes such as beans and chickpeas may help improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes, a study has found.
  • Note that the legume diet significantly lowered mean total cholesterol and triglycerides, without any changes in HDL cholesterol levels.

Article retrieved from: http://www.medpagetoday.com/PrimaryCare/DietNutrition/35491

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Adam’s YouTube Channel September 3, 2012

Posted by Dreamhealer in Allergies, Alternative medicine, Alternatives, Cancer, Dreamhealer, Energy Healing, Eyes, Healing, Health, Integrative Medicine, Links, Meditation, Multiple Sclerosis, Muscle Damage, naturopathic, Pain, Remote Healing, Video testimonials.
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So many with hypothyroidism would benefit from naturopathic therapies September 30, 2011

Posted by Dreamhealer in naturopathic.
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Marianne, age 28, consulted with me about her thyroid. She had been on Synthroid for years and wanted to know if she could come off of it.

Underactive thyroid is under diagnosed by many North American MD’s because most have not yet adopted the new parameters for diagnosis set by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists who have lowered the normal range for optimal thyroid function from 5.5 to 3.0- 2.5mU/L. In other words the higher the number the more under active the thyroid is, so there are many people with TSH in the range of 2.5-5.5 who may benefit from naturopathic therapies to improve the function of the thyroid. Usually patients who have a TSH of 5.5 or greater are put on thyroid hormone replacement therapy with prescriptions such as Synthroid or Eltroxin which only contain T4 hormone. Read More…

Naturopaths follow the Laws of Nature August 5, 2011

Posted by Dreamhealer in naturopathic.
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Recently a new patient commented on how they like coming to the office just to learn. I was happy to hear this as what I have been trying to promote over the last 26 years is the role of “doctor” as teacher. Doctor comes from the latin word “docere” which means “to teach.”

My overall goal is that any information that I am able to share with my patients will be useful for them for years to come. My website is filled with articles and newsletters that I have been writing over the last 20 years. Someone once asked me if some of these articles are now outdated and I said ‘no’!

Naturopathic medicine is really a common sense medicine built on a strong foundation of basic nutritional knowledge that doesn’t change. Sure there are many new herbs being used and new knowledge regarding nutritional medicine but there are some basic principles that stand the test of time. This is where I start with every patient.

There are 40 micronutrients plus protein, carbohydrates and fats that everybody needs for optimal health. These include 15 minerals, 15 vitamins and essential fatty acids and amino acids.

All of these are inexpensive and deficient in refined foods.

Sugary drinks are the leading source of calories around 40 grams per serving.

Premature aging can be due to a deficiency of these 40 micronutrients that lead to free radical formation and DNA damage.

These micronutrients improve the immune system, raise the good cholesterol HDL, lower Homocysteine (protein in the blood associated with inflammation and diseases of aging) and improve mitochondrial functioning.

Multivitamins do not have adequate dosages of calcium, magnesium, potassium and omega 3 essential fats.

To preserve itself in the face of these deficiencies, the body develops diseases of aging.

The role of the gut health is integral to almost any health condition including the obesity epidemic.

Following the Laws of Nature are inherent in any Naturopathic Medical practice.

This includes: getting enough sleep, getting enough time outdoors in the sun, drinking enough good quality water, eating a Mediterranean type diet, proper elimination of toxins from the body and time for peace and quiet. Read Full Article… 

Submitted by Dreamhealer

Cancer is Curable NOW !!! August 5, 2011

Posted by Dreamhealer in naturopathic.
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Alternative cancer treatment has grown into a powerful movement that is catching on quickly all over the world — a movement which will finally reveal the ignorance of conventional treatments by showing how cancer is ALREADY curable right now: not with medicine or drugs, but with knowledge.

Marcus Freudenmann and his wife Sabrina, a naturopathic doctor, traveled the world with their four children for almost three years in order to meet experts in the field of alternative cancer treatment. Their mission was to create a film about natural cancer treatments that would “wake up the world.”

The new feature-length documentary available on NaturalNews and NaturalNews.TV, called CANCER is Curable NOW, might be exactly the eye-opening breakthrough that does just that.

This documentary is powerful enough to bring millions of people to alternative cancer treatments. The more people who witness countless others getting well by doing these non-toxic treatments, the faster these remarkable alternative treatments will catch on. Read Full Article….

School of Naturopathic Medicine Graduates Largest Ever Class at 2011 July 10, 2011

Posted by Dreamhealer in naturopathic.
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Bastyr University proudly sent 283 graduates into the world at its 30th annual commencement exercises Monday, June 20, 2011, at Benaroya Hall in downtown Seattle. Graduating students came from 35 states and 12 countries, and ranged in age from 21 to 63. Among them, 100 received a doctorate in naturopathic medicine ( ND ), making it Bastyr’s largest graduating class of Naturopathic Doctors to date.

Commencement speaker and former NBA All-Star James Donaldson congratulated the graduates, advising them on their new lives with a sports analogy: “I know you’ve crossed your goal line, but it is up to you to maximize your potentials. Never, ever become satisfied until you are ready to close that chapter and say, ‘Job well done,’ and move on to another.”

Additionally, an honorary Doctor of Natural Health Arts and Sciences was awarded to Penny Simkin, senior instructor and the namesake for Bastyr University’s Simkin Center for Allied Birth Vocations. Simkin touched upon the irony that even though our country spends more on maternity care than any other, we are seeing worsening outcomes in infant mortality, maternal mortality and prematurity.

Simkin called on the graduates to help turn the tide. “You are and will continue to be living examples of the knowledge, skills and ideals exemplified by Bastyr University to the benefit of not only your clients, but the next generation,” she said. “Our world needs you!”

Student speaker and new graduate Kelsey Klausmeyer, ND, declared to his peers: “This education is a gift. After years of studies, hard work, dedication, sacrifice and faith, today we inherit this profession. We have those to thank before us, our naturopathic elders and teachers who have preserved our education.”

Bastyr awarded students with undergraduate and graduate degrees in naturopathic medicine, acupuncture and Oriental medicine, nutrition, herbal sciences, exercise science and wellness, and health psychology, as well as certificates in naturopathic midwifery and Chinese herbal medicine.

Naturopathic Physicians Vie for Prescription Privileges May 30, 2011

Posted by Dreamhealer in naturopathic.
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Naturopathic physicians want to be licensed in New York despite objections from the state’s top group of medical doctors who call them “herbal remedy practitioners.”

A bill in the state legislature would allow naturopathic physicians to prescribe nutritional supplements, natural hormones and antibiotics.

“Most degrees in those naturopathic medical schools are accredited by the U.S. Department of Education,” said Doni Wilson, head of the New York Association of Naturopathic Physicians. “The accrediting agencies are saying these are actual doctorate degrees, so we actually are doctors.”

Wilson and her peers can “consult” but cannot “diagnose and treat.”

“Our citizens of New York should be able to go to a naturopathic physician here in New York and not have to travel to Connecticut or elsewhere,” State Senator Ken LaValle said. “Alternatives are good. People go for acupuncture. They go for other alternatives. And naturopathic medicine should be one of them.”

The Medical Society of the State of New York, in a memo to state legislators, said the title “doctor of naturopathic medicine” would mislead people into thinking N.D.s are equivalent to licensed physicians.

“This bill, while purporting to protect the safety and welfare of the public, does not effectively prohibit unlicensed practitioners,” the MSSNY statement said. “Essentially, all the bill accomplishes is to require that a practitioner who uses the title ‘naturopathic doctor’ must be licensed and allows them to diagnose and prescribe.”

2011 is lucky 13 for Naturopathic Medicine Week May 30, 2011

Posted by Dreamhealer in naturopathic.
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This year marks the 13th year that Naturopathic Medicine Week (NMW) has been proclaimed in Canada. This is a national annual awareness initiative to teach members of the community about naturopathic medicine, health promotion and disease prevention.

Over the course of the week naturopathic doctors across Canada will be providing open house clinic hours as well as public workshops and lectures on topics such as the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. This is to educate the public on the benefits of naturopathic treatment. A complete listing of events is posted on http://www.cand.ca and on http://www.bcna.ca

Naturopathic physicians (ND’s) are primary health care providers with seven to eight years of post secondary education who practice safe, effective, science-based natural health care.

Naturopathic medicine is a distinct primary health care system that blends modern scientific knowledge with traditional and natural forms of medicine.

ND’s diagnose, treat and prevent disease using natural therapies including botanical medicine, clinical nutrition, hydrotherapy, homeopathy, naturopathic manipulation, traditional Chinese medicine/acupuncture and lifestyle counselling.

The big accomplishment for myself and our profession in B.C. was that 180 ND’s received limited prescribing rights in September 2010. This allows ND’s to prescribe medicines that have been taken away from them over the years, i.e. tryptophan and amino acids. The training also provides evidence-based statistics to help patients manage their prescriptions.

Across Canada there are over 1,600 registered ND’s and in B.C. there are 376 practicing ND’s. This is a far cry from the 40 of us that were practicing in B.C. in 1985 with myself being one of three women at that time. Now half of the 376 ND’s are women!

There are two schools in Canada: Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine (Toronto) and Boucher Institute of Naturopathic Medicine (Vancouver). The Canadian Association of Naturopathic Doctors (CAND) is recognized as a stakeholder with the federal government and is a participant in consultations on scientific panels and expert advisory committees. Legislation for naturopathic physicians exists in five provinces, B.C., Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Nova Scotia and Ontario. Lobbying for regulation is underway in all remaining provinces and the Northwest Territories, with Alberta legislation pending very soon.

The word doctor comes from the latin “docere” which means to teach.

ND’s take the time to educate their patients on the cause and treatment of their ailments in order for them to take a more proactive part in their health care.

It is also the role of the ND, as educator, to sift the wheat from the chaff when the media paint a negative view of natural therapies. Many ND’s, myself included, write articles and offer educational websites to continue this educational process after the visit ends.

Naturopathic medicine week is to help educate the public about the extensive expertise of naturopathic physicians in their role as coach in helping people achieve optimal health and preventing chronic disease.

Naturopathic medicine is for those who are ready to look at the underlying cause of disease and change their lifestyle.

This means getting out of their comfort zone and regular eating habits and trying new things.

I welcome you to my office for Tasting Day/Open House on May 9 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. I  will be providing tastes of various foods and recipes from my website that I find people are reluctant to try.

Now is your chance to come in for a taste. Carmen, my technician, will also be offering free candida testing from 10 a.m. to noon.

Are you ready for a change in your health? Try naturopathic medicine.

Dr. Ingrid Pincott, naturopathic physician, has been practicing since 1985 and can be reached at 250-286-3655 or http://www.DrPincott.com

Helping the body achieve balance February 24, 2011

Posted by Dreamhealer in naturopathic.
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I have been a nurse and nurse educator for over 40 years. My experience with naturopathic medicine is very different from the opinion recently expressed by Lorna Landry in the Monitor (“This mandate fails the science-geek test,” Opinion page, Feb. 16).

It is my experience that those who receive naturopathic care usually have fewer acute illnesses because they have stronger immune systems and those with chronic illnesses see a lessening or even remission of their problems. The quality of life is higher. I have never seen a person suffering from severe side effects of naturopathic therapy, but I have seen many die from the side effects of mainstream treatment with potent drugs.

It is my experience that naturopathic physicians frequently consult the latest research in their field for appropriate therapies and doses and refer patients to mainstream medicine as necessary. They use appropriate laboratory tests to diagnose and monitor the patient.

The approach in naturopathic medicine is to help the body achieve and maintain balance and thus prevent further problems. Unlike mainstream medicine where drugs are primarily given to treat a specific symptom and are “anti- ,” the formulations used in naturopathic medicine are “pro- ” and used to balance the body.

More emphasis on prevention and keeping the body in balance prevents serious, painful, debilitating and expensive problems. To paraphrase the founder of modern nursing, Florence Nightingale, we should put the patient in the best condition for nature to act upon.

JUDITH C. MILLER

Natural Doc Goes Beyond the Band-Aid February 24, 2011

Posted by Dreamhealer in naturopathic.
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Complementary medicine has become an increasingly popular idea in the last few years, with some aspects slowly being integrated into mainstream medicine. But those patients who would like to have the best of both worlds can find the solution in naturopathic doctors — and in Belfair, that’s Terra Sowinski.

A naturopath (ND) and a midwife who practices at Abel Wellness Center, Sowinksi can treat almost everything, just like a traditional doctor, but she takes it one step further. “I try to figure out what’s causing the problem,” she said. “I could put a Band-Aid on it but it would fall off, so a lot of times we’re looking for a deeper cause.”

Naturopaths receive the same medical training as MDs but in addition to that, they further study disciplines such as herbal, homeopathic and energy medicine. They can prescribe the usual pharmaceuticals and serve as primary physicians, but in Washington state are not licensed to treat cancer patients (except as wellness practitioners in conjunction with the primary physician).

One thing that’s different about NDs is the length of the visit — patients usually spend more time with their doctor, and sometimes getting to the root of the problem means multiple visits.

“A lot of people are seeking a primary doctor they like and having a naturopath gives them more options,” Sowinski said.

Much of her focus is on wellness, and she starts with the basics: diet, exercise and stress management. “If you don’t have those under control, it will be hard to get you well. Once you have your base, then we can focus on symptomatic release,” she said.

Sowinski’s practice in Belfair is turning two years old in February. An Allyn resident now, she wasn’t new to the area: Her family had property in North Mason and she spent many summers in Grapeview.

She says the field of naturopathy found her, in a way. “I was planning the traditional medical route, but when I did an internship in college, my boss suggested naturopathy,” she said.

Once she learned about the focus on health and preventative medicine, Sowinski was hooked with the idea of having the extra tool. It wasn’t necessarily an easy transition. Although she was an athlete and a collegiate gymnast already trying to lead a healthy lifestyle, naturopathy went far beyond.

“It was a huge learning curve but it was a fun curve,” she said. After becoming an ND, she overhauled her diet, and looks at her own healthy lifestyle as a work in progress. “Not everything about my life is healthy but identifying (those areas) and working on them is important,” she said.

That’s the same philosophy Sowinski has with her patients, since she knows lifestyle changes are the hardest to make. “Taking little steps and getting everyone on board, and continuing on the goals every day is what’s important,” she said.

Read more: http://www.kitsapsun.com/news/2011/feb/18/belfair-natural-doc-goes-beyond-band-aid/#ixzz1EvhWgkoX
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